Seth Rogen Says Being Jewish Is an Important Part of His Life

Seth Rogen Says Being Jewish Is an Important Part of His Life

Seth Rogen said that his Jewish identity has always been a significant component of his existence / Photo by: Gage Skidmore via Wikimedia Commons

 

Seth Rogen is a Hollywood actor, director, and comedian. He is also a writer and a producer in the entertainment industry.

"The Green Hornet" star recently shared his perspectives about being Jewish. He said that his identity has always been a significant component of his existence.

Emphasizing that being a Jew is quite essential to who he was, Rogen relayed that the first jokes that he penned were about being a person who professes Judaism as a religion.

Rogen is presently studying Yiddish, the language that Jewish people used in eastern and central Europe, as per the news posted online by Israel National News, a website that delivers updates, blogs, political commentary, live radio broadcasts, videos, and press coverage in the Middle East and the Jewish world.

"The Disaster Artist" actor would be using his linguistic ability for his role in his latest movie project, “An American Pickle.” Rogen, who also served as a voice actor in animated Hollywood films like "The Lion King" and the "Kung Fu Panda" movies, will play the character Herschel Greenbaum.

As the main character in “An American Pickle,” Rogen will portray the role of a Yiddish-speaking immigrant who moved to the United States in 1918.

Fans of the Hollywood celebrity will witness him in the film based on a short novel by Simon Rich emerging fully intact from a pickle barrel 100 years later, and get acquainted with his great-grandson who lives in Brooklyn, New York.

As a Jewish person growing up in Vancouver, British Columbia in Canada, Rogen attended Habonim Dror summer camp. Plus, he also went to a Talmud Torah elementary school, which gave him the material for his initial stand-up sets.

Rogen and his father, Mark, will receive the Generation to Generation Activism accolade from The Workmen’s Circle on Monday, December 2, in Manhattan, New York City. The organization conferring the award aims to bolster Jewish Identity based on the Yiddish language and social justice.