Medical Professionals: South Korean Patriarchal Society Partly Caused Sulli, Goo Hara Deaths of Despair

Medical Professionals: South Korean Patriarchal Society Partly Caused Sulli, Goo Hara Deaths of Despair

Medical professionals who studied South Korean culture believe that the deaths of despair of K-Pop stars Sulli and Goo Hara were partly caused by the country's male-centric social standards / Photo by: Glenn Batuyong via Flickr

 

The international music industry was shaken lately by the sudden deaths of two popular K-Pop musicians. Sulli and Goo Hara were confirmed to have taken their own lives in a space of six weeks.

The two female K-Pop artists were at the height of their fame across the Asian continent merely a few years back through their undeniable singing and performing talents, as per the news posted online by The Guardian, a British daily newspaper.

Nonetheless, medical professionals who studied South Korean culture believe that the recent deaths of despair of Goo Hara and Sulli were partly caused by the country's male-centric social standards.

Ryu Sang-ho is a neurologist at Haedong hospital, which is based in Busan. The medical doctor revealed that South Korea is a society in which people hold on to the belief that men must be given high respect.

Meanwhile, the women do not deserve the same amount of, or at least not much, due regard as their male counterparts, Ryu said. The South Korean medical professional added that the country's media industry encourages the longstanding patriarchal social belief. 

Hence, it is not astonishing to learn that the public is not empathetic towards the deceased female K-Pop icons, Ryu explained. Tae-sung Yeum is another medical professional who shares the same perspective as Ryu.

The psychiatrist, who is presently serving at the Gwanghwamun Forest psychiatric clinic, relayed that the subject of sex is taboo in South Korea. People do not feel comfortable to openly discuss this topic, unlike in western societies, Yeum said.

Furthermore, similar to Ryu, the medical doctor remarked that South Korea is a patriarchal society. Therefore, there is a lofty moral standard demanded especially for female public figures, Yeum pointed out.

Sulli was a 25-year-old singer who committed suicide in October, following years of experiencing cyberbullying. She was targeted online for not wearing a bra, addressing older male coworkers by their first names, and for live-streaming an innocent drinking session with a friend.

Her friend, Goo, was also a cyberbullying victim. The 28-year-old K-Pop musician had created throngs of foes out of her online commenters and the South Korean tabloid media.

She decried the revenge porn that her former partner threatened her with as well.